Club, Dyeing, Spinning, SweetGeorgia

Renewal: April Fibre Club

It’s already May and here was what we did for the April Fibre Club…

2009-05-05_renewal
April Fibre Club in Merino

the fibre // merino
Merino. For me, this fibre was so tempting, so enticing, I had to learn to spin it very early on. Usually, new spinners are steered away from merino and to stronger, longer stapled fibres, but spinning a skein of sproingy, super squishy merino will have you hooked. Spin this fibre with a worsted drafting method and you’ll get a beautiful and classic yarn.

the colourway // renewal
Spring is a time to renew and be made new. These colours make me think of potential, flexibility and growth. There are longer stretches of rose and lavender and shorter intervals of gold and rust and tulip leaf green. Spinning this all together and 2-plying back on itself might be a recipe for skeins of muddy looking yarn. Maybe take this opportunity to try spinning a fine, firm singles and then Navajo plying into a 3-ply in order to maintain the clarity of the colours.

I truly like to believe that we can renew ourselves. That we can be made fresh and new. That no one is keeping score of your past mistakes. That you can always try and do better. For myself personally, I’ve dedicated the month of May to trying to improve how I think about things. To really try to believe that no one is watching or waiting for me to fail. That I am doing my best and that hopefully a smigen of good will come of it.

To follow up with the previous post about meaningful work, part of me felt very ungrateful for having written it. I think that despite the great expense involved with creating and setting up this studio and business and how stressed I might get about making this all happen, I am very blessed to be in this position. I realize that in our current economic situation people around me are losing their jobs and that the cost of living and healthcare for everyone is very high. It does seem to be quite a luxury to be able to even make an attempt at your dreams.

author-avatar

About Felicia Lo

founder + creative director of SweetGeorgia // designer + dreamer // wife + mama // dyer, knitter, spinner, weaver, youtuber + author // been writing this blog about colour and craft since 2004 // see what I am making @lomeetsloom and @sweetgeorgia.

Back to list

Related Posts

12 thoughts on “Renewal: April Fibre Club

  1. Brianna says:

    Bangin’ colors!

  2. Brianna says:

    Bangin’ colors!

  3. Julia says:

    Sweet Georgia, I found your previous post very moving and I was grateful to you for sharing it. From my point of view (and I suspect other readers will agree with me) you seem to be doing something quite remarkable with your own art, in putting so much time into teaching and writing and showing us all what you do. I don’t know what private demons you may wrestle with when you’re deep in the mania or aftermath of creation but the aspects of it that come to light in this blog are really generous and inspiring. So is part of the answer to “who am I?” something to do with teaching, perpetuating a craft? in which case it seems to me that this is something you do even when you’re not actively creating but just building or rebuilding the person who creates. I hope this doesn’t seem too banal or presumptuous (what do I know?) but what you give back to the rest of us does surely have some redeeming aspect to it. Thank you so much.

  4. Julia says:

    Sweet Georgia, I found your previous post very moving and I was grateful to you for sharing it. From my point of view (and I suspect other readers will agree with me) you seem to be doing something quite remarkable with your own art, in putting so much time into teaching and writing and showing us all what you do. I don’t know what private demons you may wrestle with when you’re deep in the mania or aftermath of creation but the aspects of it that come to light in this blog are really generous and inspiring. So is part of the answer to “who am I?” something to do with teaching, perpetuating a craft? in which case it seems to me that this is something you do even when you’re not actively creating but just building or rebuilding the person who creates. I hope this doesn’t seem too banal or presumptuous (what do I know?) but what you give back to the rest of us does surely have some redeeming aspect to it. Thank you so much.

  5. Felicity says:

    Felicia, I enjoyed your blog and really appreciated the opportunity it gave me to think about the big picture. I think that being grateful for your studio and business is a separate issue from struggling with one’s identity as an artist and a person – that’s what makes us human. It didn’t cross my mind for a second that you were ungrateful – I think it takes a lot of guts to turn your artistic eye into a viable business.

  6. Felicity says:

    Felicia, I enjoyed your blog and really appreciated the opportunity it gave me to think about the big picture. I think that being grateful for your studio and business is a separate issue from struggling with one’s identity as an artist and a person – that’s what makes us human. It didn’t cross my mind for a second that you were ungrateful – I think it takes a lot of guts to turn your artistic eye into a viable business.

  7. Terry says:

    I too, was very moved by your prior post – it takes alot to put your feelings out there! I think that you are also helping the fiber lovers who buy, read and admire you, make our own creative statements too . I am so happy so have you back doing what I love!

  8. Terry says:

    I too, was very moved by your prior post – it takes alot to put your feelings out there! I think that you are also helping the fiber lovers who buy, read and admire you, make our own creative statements too . I am so happy so have you back doing what I love!

  9. Lavender says:

    That’s one of the things I love about your blog and your posts. You’ve always managed to inspire me and challenge me. I’m still digesting your last post. It’s been something that’s been on my mind for a while now (a couple of years) stuck in an ugly job but with family commitments, it’s hard to break out. Little pockets of creativity here and there allows me to survive another day here at the ugly job. Your honestly in your posts really do touch people. It shows in the comments here. You deserve a big hug.

  10. Lavender says:

    That’s one of the things I love about your blog and your posts. You’ve always managed to inspire me and challenge me. I’m still digesting your last post. It’s been something that’s been on my mind for a while now (a couple of years) stuck in an ugly job but with family commitments, it’s hard to break out. Little pockets of creativity here and there allows me to survive another day here at the ugly job. Your honestly in your posts really do touch people. It shows in the comments here. You deserve a big hug.

  11. Gaile says:

    It holds true that as individuals we are always our own harshest critic. I cannot count the number of posts I’ve written, never to publish (maybe that’s why my blog lies so quiet and unread).

    Your last post got me, and obviously a lot of others, thinking. It was an honest well-thought out post, and you should not feel ungrateful. Following a dream is hard work and usually requires sacrifice. Some people never get the opportunity, but when it happens I say rejoice in the dream.

    You are a strong woman, and you’ve set high goals. Kudos to you for continuing the struggle (even if it means having an ugly job to supplement the dream for a bit)!

  12. Gaile says:

    It holds true that as individuals we are always our own harshest critic. I cannot count the number of posts I’ve written, never to publish (maybe that’s why my blog lies so quiet and unread).

    Your last post got me, and obviously a lot of others, thinking. It was an honest well-thought out post, and you should not feel ungrateful. Following a dream is hard work and usually requires sacrifice. Some people never get the opportunity, but when it happens I say rejoice in the dream.

    You are a strong woman, and you’ve set high goals. Kudos to you for continuing the struggle (even if it means having an ugly job to supplement the dream for a bit)!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *