Knitting

Book Review & Giveaway: Knit to Flatter by Amy Herzog

I don’t know about you, but sometimes I shy away from making a lot of gorgeous hand-knit sweater designs because I’m so afraid of how it will look on me. Will it make me look like the Michelin Man? Will it accentuate my annoyingly fat upper arms? Will it highlight the fact that I am all waist but no legs? Enter Amy Herzog, a woman with a mission to make us all feel gorgeous in our clothes and comfortable in our own skin.

To get to this place of fashion freedom and enlightenment, there is a little path you must traverse, starting with discovering your body shape. Amy leads you through some steps to scrutinize your shape and measurements but does so with encouragement and acceptance at every turn.

The book is filled with ideas and instructions on how to best flatter your own figure and most loved/despised features. On top of that, there are 21 sweater patterns designed to suit all different shapes and sizes.

One of the patterns does feature our yarn, Merino Silk Fine, and is called “Flutter“. The Flutter Pullover features cable detailing on the bell-shaped sleeves to draw the eye upwards and away from the hips. (Note that the pattern says it is knit in our Coastal colourway, but it’s actually Oceanside).

I feel like this book is one that is so needed right now. There are so many luscious knitwear patterns being designed and released these days, it’s easy to rush into knitting everything that is popular. I know I’ve been guilty of that, and then disappointed in the end when the finished garment made me embarrassed to wear it in public. Getting more guidance on what styles would be more suitable seems like the smartest thing to do before investing a good chunk of change in a sweater’s worth of yarn.

Amy has graciously allowed us to giveaway one copy of her Knit to Flatter book here on the blog! To participate in the giveaway, let me know:

  • Do you have an experience with a sweater that either fit you fantastically well and flatters you?
  • Or do you have an experience with a finished garment that made you cringe to put it on?

Leave a comment here on the blog and you’ll be entered to win a copy of the book. One comment per person, please. Entries will close next week, Tuesday, April 30th at midnight, and then I’ll draw a random comment for the winner.

Post your sweater experiences and we can celebrate and/or commiserate!

author-avatar

About Felicia Lo

founder + creative director of SweetGeorgia // designer + dreamer // wife + mama // dyer, knitter, spinner, weaver, youtuber + author // been writing this blog about colour and craft since 2004 // see what I am making @lomeetsloom and @sweetgeorgia.

Back to list

Related Posts

264 thoughts on “Book Review & Giveaway: Knit to Flatter by Amy Herzog

  1. islandspindler says:

    Handspun yarn, low twist singles, great colours but pills like crazy everythime I look at it. Knit in a pattern by a well known designer that I love ,but I also know her designs do not flattery my mature body, sigh. I am taking Amy’s class on Craftsy, would love to have the book!

  2. islandspindler says:

    Handspun yarn, low twist singles, great colours but pills like crazy everythime I look at it. Knit in a pattern by a well known designer that I love ,but I also know her designs do not flattery my mature body, sigh. I am taking Amy’s class on Craftsy, would love to have the book!

  3. I made a Tea Leaves cardigan with Madeline Tosh DK in dustbowl, and it was gorgeous! Only, I underestimated how wide the neck sits, so it nearly slides down my shoulders. It didn’t help that the yarn relaxed more than I expected, and I sized up, instead of down. I’m torn between trying to MacGyver a solution and just frogging it, so it floats from space to space in my apartment. :(

    1. Sophie Fairchild says:

      A lot of folks have had some success with crocheting (slipstitch) around the neckline of this pattern to pull it in a bit.

    2. islandspindler says:

      yes, i made the same pattern and crocheted a slipstitch edge, and it fits much better now and does not slip off my shoulders.

  4. Sandra Yuen Helsley says:

    I made a Tea Leaves cardigan with Madeline Tosh DK in dustbowl, and it was gorgeous! Only, I underestimated how wide the neck sits, so it nearly slides down my shoulders. It didn’t help that the yarn relaxed more than I expected, and I sized up, instead of down. I’m torn between trying to MacGyver a solution and just frogging it, so it floats from space to space in my apartment. :(

    1. sophiefair says:

      A lot of folks have had some success with crocheting (slipstitch) around the neckline of this pattern to pull it in a bit.

    2. islandspindler says:

      yes, i made the same pattern and crocheted a slipstitch edge, and it fits much better now and does not slip off my shoulders.

  5. I can’t say that I have knit a sweater for myself yet, although I am working on a cardigan, but I received a Fisherman’s Sweater as a gift from my grandmother and it fit me so well that I wore it until it started to unravel from too many machine washes! I wish that I had known how to care for handknits but I was really young! :)
    Thanks for the opportunity to win Amy’s book! :)

  6. Lori J. Thorne says:

    I can’t say that I have knit a sweater for myself yet, although I am working on a cardigan, but I received a Fisherman’s Sweater as a gift from my grandmother and it fit me so well that I wore it until it started to unravel from too many machine washes! I wish that I had known how to care for handknits but I was really young! :)
    Thanks for the opportunity to win Amy’s book! :)

  7. Anita Jamieson says:

    I have NEVER knit a sweater that looks good on me. They are too long, or not fitted enough, or too short. I keep trying though.

  8. Anita Jamieson says:

    I have NEVER knit a sweater that looks good on me. They are too long, or not fitted enough, or too short. I keep trying though.

  9. Sophie Fairchild says:

    I have only knit 3 sweaters so far, and one was for my DH. But I am delighted with how my Equinox Raglan pullover fits. I think it helps that the yarn I used is pretty forgiving — it is a chainette yarn, so it seems to have a bit of extra stretch. One of my friends is a super-experienced sweater knitter, and she always advocates for negative ease.

    I am nearly finished with a Low Tide cardigan (pattern from tincanknits), and while I stil love the pattern, and knitting it was a wonderful experience, I don’t think it will suit me. Sometimes I want to knit sweaters for the body that I wish I had, rather than the body I have. :)

  10. sophiefair says:

    I have only knit 3 sweaters so far, and one was for my DH. But I am delighted with how my Equinox Raglan pullover fits. I think it helps that the yarn I used is pretty forgiving — it is a chainette yarn, so it seems to have a bit of extra stretch. One of my friends is a super-experienced sweater knitter, and she always advocates for negative ease.

    I am nearly finished with a Low Tide cardigan (pattern from tincanknits), and while I stil love the pattern, and knitting it was a wonderful experience, I don’t think it will suit me. Sometimes I want to knit sweaters for the body that I wish I had, rather than the body I have. :)

  11. eadaoine says:

    I rarely knit sweaters for myself because of the disconnect between what I actually look like and what I imagine. I would love to have a copy of this book.

  12. eadaoine says:

    I rarely knit sweaters for myself because of the disconnect between what I actually look like and what I imagine. I would love to have a copy of this book.

  13. Rachel Brown says:

    Long ago, in college, I decided I needed to knit myself a cabled Aran pullover. I spent months knitting the thing, and when I finally finished it, it was a wee bit big. Now, this was the early 90s and oversized was certainly a staple part of my wardrobe aesthetic at the time, but when I say a wee bit big, I mean approximately 14 inches of ease. Strangely enough, I had to go back to the shop to get more yarn to finish it, so I suspect I may have had a bit of a gauge problem…

    I finally pulled out the sweater earlier this year and ripped it out so I could reuse the yarn on something that will actually work better for me then a natural white circus tent. Maybe Amy’s book can help?

  14. Rachel Brown says:

    Long ago, in college, I decided I needed to knit myself a cabled Aran pullover. I spent months knitting the thing, and when I finally finished it, it was a wee bit big. Now, this was the early 90s and oversized was certainly a staple part of my wardrobe aesthetic at the time, but when I say a wee bit big, I mean approximately 14 inches of ease. Strangely enough, I had to go back to the shop to get more yarn to finish it, so I suspect I may have had a bit of a gauge problem…

    I finally pulled out the sweater earlier this year and ripped it out so I could reuse the yarn on something that will actually work better for me then a natural white circus tent. Maybe Amy’s book can help?

  15. Ruinwen Dagorielle says:

    I knit a sweater that everything fit me perfectly but the bust; it stuck out just waiting for someone with bigger shoes to fill it…and that, is not going to happen. So I gave it to a friend who was much more endowed then I.

  16. Ruinwen Dagorielle says:

    I knit a sweater that everything fit me perfectly but the bust; it stuck out just waiting for someone with bigger shoes to fill it…and that, is not going to happen. So I gave it to a friend who was much more endowed then I.

  17. Brooke says:

    I am lucky and the first sweater I made, the shapely boyfriend cardigan is really flattering.

  18. Brooke says:

    I am lucky and the first sweater I made, the shapely boyfriend cardigan is really flattering.

  19. JMB says:

    I’ve done both. Have a beautiful cardigan that fits perfectly and flatters and that I adore. I also have a tank that makes my hips look 3x wider than they are — not flattering!

  20. JMB says:

    I’ve done both. Have a beautiful cardigan that fits perfectly and flatters and that I adore. I also have a tank that makes my hips look 3x wider than they are — not flattering!

  21. Jen Funk says:

    I tried very hard to knit a beautiful Veera Cardigan and after 2 froggings I just gave up. It really wouldn’t lie on my body properly. Then I took a sweater knitting class and discovered how to measure things. I now have my first ever sweater that I’ve knit that fits. I don’t always learn things easily though. I was over half way done making a beautiful curling sweater for my son and I thought I was done the main body but it turned out way to short. measure, measure, measure. I think I’ve got it now.

  22. Jen Funk says:

    I tried very hard to knit a beautiful Veera Cardigan and after 2 froggings I just gave up. It really wouldn’t lie on my body properly. Then I took a sweater knitting class and discovered how to measure things. I now have my first ever sweater that I’ve knit that fits. I don’t always learn things easily though. I was over half way done making a beautiful curling sweater for my son and I thought I was done the main body but it turned out way to short. measure, measure, measure. I think I’ve got it now.

  23. docksjo says:

    I do have positive experience with sweater knitting. Sweaters are my favorite knitting and I have made 26 not all well but most + a few for my teddybear when a was a child. I’m always eager to expand my knowledge.
    Ninnilna on Ravelry

  24. docksjo says:

    I do have positive experience with sweater knitting. Sweaters are my favorite knitting and I have made 26 not all well but most + a few for my teddybear when a was a child. I’m always eager to expand my knowledge.
    Ninnilna on Ravelry

  25. Tamara Paetkau says:

    Thanks for the chance to win! My cringe situation happened when I knit a fair-isle cardigan with the colourwork at the bottom of the sweater. Not good for my bottom-heavy shape!

  26. Tamara Paetkau says:

    Thanks for the chance to win! My cringe situation happened when I knit a fair-isle cardigan with the colourwork at the bottom of the sweater. Not good for my bottom-heavy shape!

  27. Debie Wiebe says:

    I would love to learn how to make a sweater that fits!! I am making my very first one. The pattern is from Elizabeth Zimmerman, the Mitered Corner Cardigan. So far, so good!

  28. Debie Wiebe says:

    I would love to learn how to make a sweater that fits!! I am making my very first one. The pattern is from Elizabeth Zimmerman, the Mitered Corner Cardigan. So far, so good!

  29. Rebecca Coupland says:

    My first sweater was an experience that left me having not knit another since! Amazing yarn that I splurged on, but a boxy, bulky, oversized mess in the end. I can’t even bring myself to frog it so I can use the yarn, since it brings back the disappointment. This book could save me!

  30. Rebecca Coupland says:

    My first sweater was an experience that left me having not knit another since! Amazing yarn that I splurged on, but a boxy, bulky, oversized mess in the end. I can’t even bring myself to frog it so I can use the yarn, since it brings back the disappointment. This book could save me!

  31. Lisa Kristalovich says:

    I have a hand-me down sweater that I love. It’s so well loved, it has holes in the elbows and under the arms. I’m pretty sure it’s no longer fit to be seen in public. I’m knitting my first sweater right now and mildly terrified how it will turn out. I have several other sweater patterns lined up, but they are more fitted and I’m not sure of my skills. Would live to have a resource like this.

    I’ve added Flutter to my faves. I love it!

  32. Lisa Kristalovich says:

    I have a hand-me down sweater that I love. It’s so well loved, it has holes in the elbows and under the arms. I’m pretty sure it’s no longer fit to be seen in public. I’m knitting my first sweater right now and mildly terrified how it will turn out. I have several other sweater patterns lined up, but they are more fitted and I’m not sure of my skills. Would live to have a resource like this.

    I’ve added Flutter to my faves. I love it!

  33. Julie says:

    I’m taking courage to return to knitting garments after many years of sticking with scarves because nothing ever fit properly!
    Great idea for a book…

  34. Julie says:

    I’m taking courage to return to knitting garments after many years of sticking with scarves because nothing ever fit properly!
    Great idea for a book…

  35. Knitography says:

    I haven’t made a cringe-worthy sweater, but I haven’t made a perfect one either. I’ve been eyeing this book as a great resource to ensure my sweaters end up fitting as well as I’d like them to (and as well as the lovely yarn and hours of work deserve).

  36. Knitography says:

    I haven’t made a cringe-worthy sweater, but I haven’t made a perfect one either. I’ve been eyeing this book as a great resource to ensure my sweaters end up fitting as well as I’d like them to (and as well as the lovely yarn and hours of work deserve).

  37. Debbie says:

    What a nice-looking book! I agree that sweater-knitting is something that draws me, but it’s such a dollar and time investment that it scares me at the same time. I had a terrible sweater (my first) but I recently completed a Fuse cardigan and I really like it. Thank goodness! I’m careful with schematics and swatching and hope to never again have a sweater that I don’t like.

  38. Debbie says:

    What a nice-looking book! I agree that sweater-knitting is something that draws me, but it’s such a dollar and time investment that it scares me at the same time. I had a terrible sweater (my first) but I recently completed a Fuse cardigan and I really like it. Thank goodness! I’m careful with schematics and swatching and hope to never again have a sweater that I don’t like.

  39. Deano says:

    I made a beautiful sweater from the Coastal Knits book. The sweater had a peplum–very stylish, but not at all flattering for my pear shape! Frogged it . . . I would love to have a copy of Amy’s book!

  40. Deano says:

    I made a beautiful sweater from the Coastal Knits book. The sweater had a peplum–very stylish, but not at all flattering for my pear shape! Frogged it . . . I would love to have a copy of Amy’s book!

  41. MaxTW says:

    Oh, I’ve tried to knit sweaters. My latest completion was Imogen by Perl Grey. Lovely sweater — just not my interpretation of it. It languished on the needles for years. This year I vowed to finish & finish I did. Now I can’t even take a picture for my Ravelry page it’s so bad. Please put me back on sweater knitting track! Thanks!

  42. MaxTW says:

    Oh, I’ve tried to knit sweaters. My latest completion was Imogen by Perl Grey. Lovely sweater — just not my interpretation of it. It languished on the needles for years. This year I vowed to finish & finish I did. Now I can’t even take a picture for my Ravelry page it’s so bad. Please put me back on sweater knitting track! Thanks!

  43. Sheila says:

    I made Henry the VII out of Alice Starmore’s Tudor Rose book out of a lovely cream colored alpaca. A lovely pattern for a sweater, except the design has dropped shoulders that ar too big of the model’s shoulders. Add the weight of alpaca, and well,it’s unwearable. Still in a box waiting to be frogged.

  44. Sheila says:

    I made Henry the VII out of Alice Starmore’s Tudor Rose book out of a lovely cream colored alpaca. A lovely pattern for a sweater, except the design has dropped shoulders that ar too big of the model’s shoulders. Add the weight of alpaca, and well,it’s unwearable. Still in a box waiting to be frogged.

  45. Celeste Culpepper says:

    I have knit several sweaters that I love to wear, the most recent is Anna Maria Cardigan by Connie Chan Chinchio.

    My up coming summer project will be Grace by Jane Richmond.

  46. Celeste Culpepper says:

    I have knit several sweaters that I love to wear, the most recent is Anna Maria Cardigan by Connie Chan Chinchio.

    My up coming summer project will be Grace by Jane Richmond.

  47. Jana says:

    I’ve had some successes and failures. My best success was right after reading the original fit to flatter blog. I made modified version of “Something Red” that still gets complements. I’m really looking forward to reading the F2F book so I can make more sweaters that I love and wear!

  48. Jana says:

    I’ve had some successes and failures. My best success was right after reading the original fit to flatter blog. I made modified version of “Something Red” that still gets complements. I’m really looking forward to reading the F2F book so I can make more sweaters that I love and wear!

  49. Cécile BERNE says:

    This book sounds very informative. I made many sweaters, but I’m in love with only one of them, the other ones are OK, but don’t flatter me the way I would like them to… Which is sad, when you think of the investments in time and monye I put into them :(

  50. cecile says:

    This book sounds very informative. I made many sweaters, but I’m in love with only one of them, the other ones are OK, but don’t flatter me the way I would like them to… Which is sad, when you think of the investments in time and monye I put into them :(

  51. Teresa says:

    I’ve made two sweaters…the hourglass sweater from Purl by Joelle Hoverson and Vodka Lemonade Cardigan by Thea Coleman. The hourglass is too huge and Vodka Lemonade was so small I hade to give it away. I am obviously doing something wrong!

  52. Teresa says:

    I’ve made two sweaters…the hourglass sweater from Purl by Joelle Hoverson and Vodka Lemonade Cardigan by Thea Coleman. The hourglass is too huge and Vodka Lemonade was so small I hade to give it away. I am obviously doing something wrong!

  53. Louisa says:

    And here I thought you look lovely in everything, Felicia!

    My greatest sweater mistake was dropped shoulders. They look absolutely awful on me. Come to think of it, do they look good on anyone? I’ve been knitting for so long that I definitely have made some clunkers over the years. The nice thing about knitting is that you can always frog it and make something better with the yarn. There’s a reason why I avoid steeking…

  54. Louisa says:

    And here I thought you look lovely in everything, Felicia!

    My greatest sweater mistake was dropped shoulders. They look absolutely awful on me. Come to think of it, do they look good on anyone? I’ve been knitting for so long that I definitely have made some clunkers over the years. The nice thing about knitting is that you can always frog it and make something better with the yarn. There’s a reason why I avoid steeking…

  55. Sarah says:

    If anyone HASN’T knit an unflattering sweater, I’m green with envy! I still can’t seem to get my waist shaping correctly placed, despite years of practice, and have begun to wonder if placing decreases at the side “seam” simply isn’t a very good idea. Also, anything with too high a neck seems to make my breasts look like they’re too far south. (I think it’s because I’m so tall, but maybe they actually are!) Anyway, I can’t wait to get a good look at Amy’s book. It seems like such a gift to women, whether they knit or not.

  56. Sarah says:

    If anyone HASN’T knit an unflattering sweater, I’m green with envy! I still can’t seem to get my waist shaping correctly placed, despite years of practice, and have begun to wonder if placing decreases at the side “seam” simply isn’t a very good idea. Also, anything with too high a neck seems to make my breasts look like they’re too far south. (I think it’s because I’m so tall, but maybe they actually are!) Anyway, I can’t wait to get a good look at Amy’s book. It seems like such a gift to women, whether they knit or not.

  57. Tiffany says:

    I have made two long sleeved sweaters and both don’t fit they way I would like.
    I can read patterns but I don’t know how to adjust a pattern to fit me. This book would be perfect!
    I can get the body to fit my waist but not my hips or bust. I don’t understand when patterns are written why they don’t write how to increase or decrease for hips, bust and waist. That would be great help when anyone is knitting a sweater! This is why this book would be perfect for everyone to have!! You will get lot’s of sweaters that fit you better and looks good on you!

    I wish everyone good luck!

  58. Tiffany says:

    I have made two long sleeved sweaters and both don’t fit they way I would like.
    I can read patterns but I don’t know how to adjust a pattern to fit me. This book would be perfect!
    I can get the body to fit my waist but not my hips or bust. I don’t understand when patterns are written why they don’t write how to increase or decrease for hips, bust and waist. That would be great help when anyone is knitting a sweater! This is why this book would be perfect for everyone to have!! You will get lot’s of sweaters that fit you better and looks good on you!

    I wish everyone good luck!

  59. Shawnna says:

    Oh do I ever know the pain of knitting for weeks only to hate the finished garment. I think the first 5 sweaters I knit in the 90s were all outsided, boxy disasters. I’ve been an enthusiastic sock and shawl knitter ever since. I’d love to overcome my fear of garments and it sounds like Amy’s book would help get me there. Thanks to you both for this opportunity!

  60. Shawnna says:

    Oh do I ever know the pain of knitting for weeks only to hate the finished garment. I think the first 5 sweaters I knit in the 90s were all outsided, boxy disasters. I’ve been an enthusiastic sock and shawl knitter ever since. I’d love to overcome my fear of garments and it sounds like Amy’s book would help get me there. Thanks to you both for this opportunity!

  61. Savannagal says:

    I’ve yet to finish a full sweater, but I did complete a vest that turned out awful, and nothing at all like the photo on the pattern. I actually knit it 3 different times and each time it was awful. I’m going to frog it and throw the paid for pattern in the trash. Knitting can be very disheartening sometimes.

  62. Guest says:

    I’ve yet to finish a full sweater, but I did complete a vest that turned out awful, and nothing at all like the photo on the pattern. I actually knit it 3 different times and each time it was awful. I’m going to frog it and throw the paid for pattern in the trash. Knitting can be very disheartening sometimes.

  63. Megan says:

    I made a hat once that I was so proud of (designed it myself, my first experience cabling without a pattern) and then I put it on my head and I looked like an elf. And not a cute elf. LIke a creepy big pointy headed elf. I gave it to my sister who has a larger head (and hence made it spread out a little and look less weird).

  64. Megan says:

    I made a hat once that I was so proud of (designed it myself, my first experience cabling without a pattern) and then I put it on my head and I looked like an elf. And not a cute elf. LIke a creepy big pointy headed elf. I gave it to my sister who has a larger head (and hence made it spread out a little and look less weird).

  65. p.quilts says:

    This is a fantastic subject for knitting. We all vary so much and what really does work with someone with broad shoulders? I could use some help on that. Thanks for the opportunity to win a free book.

  66. p.quilts says:

    This is a fantastic subject for knitting. We all vary so much and what really does work with someone with broad shoulders? I could use some help on that. Thanks for the opportunity to win a free book.

  67. Michelle Cormack says:

    I have been taking Amy’s Craftsy class (the companion to this book) and I have to say it has opened my eyes to the world of customization that is available to knitters. I always think “I’m not a designer, I can’t change the pattern or I’ll mess it up”… but using Amy’s tips, I recently customized waist shaping in a pattern and I can honestly say I’ve never knit anything that fits me better. A far, far cry from the first sweater I knit that literally grew to my knees and far beyond my wrists because I didn’t think gauge was important!

  68. Michelle Cormack says:

    I have been taking Amy’s Craftsy class (the companion to this book) and I have to say it has opened my eyes to the world of customization that is available to knitters. I always think “I’m not a designer, I can’t change the pattern or I’ll mess it up”… but using Amy’s tips, I recently customized waist shaping in a pattern and I can honestly say I’ve never knit anything that fits me better. A far, far cry from the first sweater I knit that literally grew to my knees and far beyond my wrists because I didn’t think gauge was important!

  69. Rebecca says:

    I’m sort of in between. I have a pullover that I was so proud of, my first made without a pattern, calculated and knitted to fit me. I had been wearing it happily until I watched the videos in Amy’s Craftsy class and learned that the bottom really shouldn’t hover, helicopter-like, around my hips, that it would be more flattering if it *fit* my hips, even with some negative ease. I wasn’t sure about that, but since it was knitted top-down, it was easy enough to rip back a few inches and remove some increases so it would fit more closely. I’m glad I did it as it does look better now. I’d love to have Amy’s book as a reference in addition to the class. Fabulous material she’s sharing!!
    ~ Rebecca (knittingwithwords on Ravelry)

  70. Rebecca says:

    I’m sort of in between. I have a pullover that I was so proud of, my first made without a pattern, calculated and knitted to fit me. I had been wearing it happily until I watched the videos in Amy’s Craftsy class and learned that the bottom really shouldn’t hover, helicopter-like, around my hips, that it would be more flattering if it *fit* my hips, even with some negative ease. I wasn’t sure about that, but since it was knitted top-down, it was easy enough to rip back a few inches and remove some increases so it would fit more closely. I’m glad I did it as it does look better now. I’d love to have Amy’s book as a reference in addition to the class. Fabulous material she’s sharing!!
    ~ Rebecca (knittingwithwords on Ravelry)

  71. RebeccaPL says:

    I have also been taking Amy’s Craftsy class and I’m really learning a lot! I’d love to add this book to my shelf!

  72. RebeccaPL says:

    I have also been taking Amy’s Craftsy class and I’m really learning a lot! I’d love to add this book to my shelf!

  73. Gale Longley says:

    It’s my dream to make myself a sweater this book looks like a great start.

  74. Gale Longley says:

    It’s my dream to make myself a sweater this book looks like a great start.

  75. lisa says:

    I love to knit and I especially love to knit sweaters. And they never fit me because I have no idea how my body shape relates to the shape of the sweater I am knitting. From all that I read about this book, it may be just the tutorial I need so that I will from now on be able to wear the beauties that come off my needle instead of giving them away to a body they will fit!

  76. lisa says:

    I love to knit and I especially love to knit sweaters. And they never fit me because I have no idea how my body shape relates to the shape of the sweater I am knitting. From all that I read about this book, it may be just the tutorial I need so that I will from now on be able to wear the beauties that come off my needle instead of giving them away to a body they will fit!

  77. Claudia Joyal says:

    The first sweater i knit was a super simple raglan cardigan. The pattern was more of a guide then an actual pattern and let me do my own math so i could make it to fit my body. It is a wonderful sweater and i still wear it all the time. I think it made me realize very early on that fit was important and the pattern could always be changed to make my body look like it’s supposed to. I’ve had to frog and redo parts of many sweaters since then because my fit isn’t always great but i rarely finish a sweater if i’m not satisfied with it or i know i just won’t wear it. Who would want such a waste of yarn!!!

  78. Claudia Joyal says:

    The first sweater i knit was a super simple raglan cardigan. The pattern was more of a guide then an actual pattern and let me do my own math so i could make it to fit my body. It is a wonderful sweater and i still wear it all the time. I think it made me realize very early on that fit was important and the pattern could always be changed to make my body look like it’s supposed to. I’ve had to frog and redo parts of many sweaters since then because my fit isn’t always great but i rarely finish a sweater if i’m not satisfied with it or i know i just won’t wear it. Who would want such a waste of yarn!!!

  79. French Gypsy says:

    Wonderful Subject that has not been addressed like it should be. Great to see the book!

  80. French Gypsy says:

    Wonderful Subject that has not been addressed like it should be. Great to see the book!

  81. Zaelia Blue says:

    I recently knit my first sweater – a raglan pullover. It fits well, but I wish I’d followed my instinct and made it a little longer. I think this book would help me to understand the construction of garments and how to customize them.

  82. Zaelia Blue says:

    I recently knit my first sweater – a raglan pullover. It fits well, but I wish I’d followed my instinct and made it a little longer. I think this book would help me to understand the construction of garments and how to customize them.

  83. Ashley Nivison says:

    So – cardigans/sweaters. For my first cardigan, I started the Vine Yoke Cardi by Ysolda, chose a great colour, but the cheapest yarn – as I wanted to have something cheap if I screwed up, it was not a big waste.
    Well, sure enough, the cheapest yarn was not worth it. Ripping out has been awful, catching, etc. I would much rather rip out great yarn, and reknit the sweater or another pattern. Seriously, what was I thinking? The pattern is fine, I just knit one arm too big, the other too small. Awesome when it’s knit side to side – so you have to rip the whole thing.
    It’s currently sitting in a bag, in the dark, having some alone time. Anyone want to swap a hand knit sweater 1/2 ripped out, 1/2 in a sweater form with knots for pretty Sweet Georgia?
    This book would be awesome to win! Thanks for the post, love getting them!

  84. Ashley Nivison says:

    So – cardigans/sweaters. For my first cardigan, I started the Vine Yoke Cardi by Ysolda, chose a great colour, but the cheapest yarn – as I wanted to have something cheap if I screwed up, it was not a big waste.
    Well, sure enough, the cheapest yarn was not worth it. Ripping out has been awful, catching, etc. I would much rather rip out great yarn, and reknit the sweater or another pattern. Seriously, what was I thinking? The pattern is fine, I just knit one arm too big, the other too small. Awesome when it’s knit side to side – so you have to rip the whole thing.
    It’s currently sitting in a bag, in the dark, having some alone time. Anyone want to swap a hand knit sweater 1/2 ripped out, 1/2 in a sweater form with knots for pretty Sweet Georgia?
    This book would be awesome to win! Thanks for the post, love getting them!

  85. Paula Castro says:

    I’ve never knit a sweater, but it’s definitively in my plans!

  86. Paula Castro says:

    I’ve never knit a sweater, but it’s definitively in my plans!

  87. naomil1 says:

    I made a cardigan that was knit side to side and it came out very wide on me. I thought a quick spin in the dryer might help it, but I way overdid the timing and it felted into the size of a child’s sweater and about an inch thick.
    naomil1@verizon.net

  88. naomil1 says:

    I made a cardigan that was knit side to side and it came out very wide on me. I thought a quick spin in the dryer might help it, but I way overdid the timing and it felted into the size of a child’s sweater and about an inch thick.
    naomil1@verizon.net

  89. Sandy Snellman says:

    My sweaters are always too big because of my fear of having it be too small. I always go up a size and regret it later. Help.

  90. Sandy Snellman says:

    My sweaters are always too big because of my fear of having it be too small. I always go up a size and regret it later. Help.

  91. Tina P. says:

    In my mind’s eye the color, fit and style were perfect…I would be getting complements and looks of envy for the look and skill. But, alas I am just five feet tall and a bit overweight to boot, the sweater just hung and the color, the nice milk and coffee color-well, like dirt, not even good soil, just dirt. At least I have skill…still delusional, what is that stitch?

  92. Tina P. says:

    In my mind’s eye the color, fit and style were perfect…I would be getting complements and looks of envy for the look and skill. But, alas I am just five feet tall and a bit overweight to boot, the sweater just hung and the color, the nice milk and coffee color-well, like dirt, not even good soil, just dirt. At least I have skill…still delusional, what is that stitch?

  93. Julia Fallon says:

    The best fitting sweater that I ever knit was the Ardara out of the Contemporary Irish Knits book by Carol Feller. For a girl with curves, I find so many knit sweaters either make even a slim, fit, curvy gal like myself look absolutely ginromous. I am glad that some designers think about waist and bust shaping, etc. I have heard such good things about this book by Amy Herzog. Thank you for putting out the tools out there to adapt and knit for shape!

  94. Julia Fallon says:

    The best fitting sweater that I ever knit was the Ardara out of the Contemporary Irish Knits book by Carol Feller. For a girl with curves, I find so many knit sweaters either make even a slim, fit, curvy gal like myself look absolutely ginromous. I am glad that some designers think about waist and bust shaping, etc. I have heard such good things about this book by Amy Herzog. Thank you for putting out the tools out there to adapt and knit for shape!

  95. Janet R says:

    I know what patterns I’m attracted to, but I have no idea if they’d be flattering to my body. So I mostly knit for others (not sweaters)! I’d love to have this book for good advice on how to knit for myself and others! Thanks for the giveaway!

  96. Janet R says:

    I know what patterns I’m attracted to, but I have no idea if they’d be flattering to my body. So I mostly knit for others (not sweaters)! I’d love to have this book for good advice on how to knit for myself and others! Thanks for the giveaway!

  97. Janie says:

    Currently I need to frog and re-knit my February Ladies Sweater because I made it to fit my rear and as a result the shoulders and chest are huge, not to mention the yo increases ended up right across my bust line and someone asked if they were vent holes for “the girls”! I know that this book would teach me the correct way to make garments for myself that not only fit, but flatter as well!

  98. Janie says:

    Currently I need to frog and re-knit my February Ladies Sweater because I made it to fit my rear and as a result the shoulders and chest are huge, not to mention the yo increases ended up right across my bust line and someone asked if they were vent holes for “the girls”! I know that this book would teach me the correct way to make garments for myself that not only fit, but flatter as well!

  99. I have a terrible time with sweaters. And actually went many years in between knitting them because it was so frustrating to work on something so time consuming and then have it not fit exactly right. They never quite fit across the chest, which, if you saw me in person, is hilarious as I’m no where near large busted or even ‘busted’ at all. I swatch, I measure … sigh! Help!

  100. Jacqueline says:

    I’ve knit four sweaters for myself, and have really realized that pattern selection is a VERY important part of the process. I’ve read Amy Herzog’s blog posts in the Fit to Flatter series quite a few times, and I was so excited when I heard she was writing a book – we take such time and care with our handknits, it’s important to learn how to choose patterns that will make us look and feel good.

  101. I have a terrible time with sweaters. And actually went many years in between knitting them because it was so frustrating to work on something so time consuming and then have it not fit exactly right. They never quite fit across the chest, which, if you saw me in person, is hilarious as I’m no where near large busted or even ‘busted’ at all. I swatch, I measure … sigh! Help!

  102. Jacqueline says:

    I’ve knit four sweaters for myself, and have really realized that pattern selection is a VERY important part of the process. I’ve read Amy Herzog’s blog posts in the Fit to Flatter series quite a few times, and I was so excited when I heard she was writing a book – we take such time and care with our handknits, it’s important to learn how to choose patterns that will make us look and feel good.

  103. artistmaybe says:

    I am currently knitting a top down sweater that is turning out to be the best fitting sweater I have made to date.
    I have actually been pretty lucky that most of the sweaters I have tackled turned out at least for the most part. My first ever pull over was a bit too bulky and warm but it fit.
    My second one was a tank and if I did it again the only thing I would change is the size of the arm holes as they were a bit tight. (by the way this was about 20 years ago) One of my more recent sweaters was the only problem was I picked the wrong yarn as it starting pilling the first time I wore the sweater. This latest one I am hoping is going to last much longer then that.
    It would be nice to know how to pick the right style for my body type

  104. artistmaybe says:

    I am currently knitting a top down sweater that is turning out to be the best fitting sweater I have made to date.
    I have actually been pretty lucky that most of the sweaters I have tackled turned out at least for the most part. My first ever pull over was a bit too bulky and warm but it fit.
    My second one was a tank and if I did it again the only thing I would change is the size of the arm holes as they were a bit tight. (by the way this was about 20 years ago) One of my more recent sweaters was the only problem was I picked the wrong yarn as it starting pilling the first time I wore the sweater. This latest one I am hoping is going to last much longer then that.
    It would be nice to know how to pick the right style for my body type

  105. linda roller says:

    I have Many sweater patterns. I have yet to knit one for me.I need Amy’s book to fit to flatter me .rinebird. On ravelry

  106. linda roller says:

    I have Many sweater patterns. I have yet to knit one for me.I need Amy’s book to fit to flatter me .rinebird. On ravelry

  107. Debbie Hallamek says:

    My first sweater was a disaster. Way too big!

  108. Debbie says:

    My first sweater was a disaster. Way too big!

  109. Leona says:

    I’m really excited about Amy Herzog’s new book. Will be getting my hands on a copy as soon as possible!!!

  110. Leona says:

    I’m really excited about Amy Herzog’s new book. Will be getting my hands on a copy as soon as possible!!!

  111. Susan Stuart says:

    I’m short, heave, and have lots of curves – everywhere! I see many beautiful sweater patterns that I’d like to make for myself, but I’ve pretty much given up making them. Having information, and not just a few tips, on how to create a sweater I would be happy and comfortable to wear would be wonderful!!!

    1. Colleen Esc says:

      all over that!

  112. Susan Stuart says:

    I’m short, heave, and have lots of curves – everywhere! I see many beautiful sweater patterns that I’d like to make for myself, but I’ve pretty much given up making them. Having information, and not just a few tips, on how to create a sweater I would be happy and comfortable to wear would be wonderful!!!

    1. Colleen Esc says:

      all over that!

  113. tania deleva says:

    I’ve done a few sweaters years ago. They did not fit that well but I loved them and wore them a lot.
    Now that my body is bigger, I don’t know how to choose a sweater to flt properly and flatter it. So hope this book will help.

  114. tania deleva says:

    I’ve done a few sweaters years ago. They did not fit that well but I loved them and wore them a lot.
    Now that my body is bigger, I don’t know how to choose a sweater to flt properly and flatter it. So hope this book will help.

  115. ysabel h says:

    One of my first knitting cardigan was a disaster as you can see here: https://www.ravelry.com/projects/ysabelh/gilet-femme-488-t7—536, I didn’t choose the proper yarn for the project. On the contrary the one that fits me the most is Lady February Sweater. I love this cardigan!

  116. Ysabelh says:

    One of my first knitting cardigan was a disaster as you can see here: https://www.ravelry.com/projects/ysabelh/gilet-femme-488-t7—536, I didn’t choose the proper yarn for the project. On the contrary the one that fits me the most is Lady February Sweater. I love this cardigan!

  117. Nina Chen says:

    I’m very intrigued with this book, and plan to have a look through it via the library to see if it would be useful to me. I was happy with the fit of the first (and only so far) pullover I made recently. I have no waist but this pattern had shaping in the back that pulled it in and I found the fit to be quite flattering. I’d like to try more fitted sweaters and it sounds like this book may be required reading!

  118. felis44 says:

    I’m very intrigued with this book, and plan to have a look through it via the library to see if it would be useful to me. I was happy with the fit of the first (and only so far) pullover I made recently. I have no waist but this pattern had shaping in the back that pulled it in and I found the fit to be quite flattering. I’d like to try more fitted sweaters and it sounds like this book may be required reading!

  119. Marilyn says:

    I’m busty and have a lot of trouble with buttoned cardigans closing without gaping. I want my cardigans to fit in the bust but not be too baggy in the rest of the body. Thanks for the chance to win this great book!

  120. Marilyn says:

    I’m busty and have a lot of trouble with buttoned cardigans closing without gaping. I want my cardigans to fit in the bust but not be too baggy in the rest of the body. Thanks for the chance to win this great book!

  121. Emily Latman says:

    I haven’t had any sweaters that were just completely wrong for my body type, but the only one I ever knit that I just love love love and get tons of compliments on is the Planche Vest from a recent Interweave Knits.

  122. Emily Latman says:

    I haven’t had any sweaters that were just completely wrong for my body type, but the only one I ever knit that I just love love love and get tons of compliments on is the Planche Vest from a recent Interweave Knits.

  123. Catie Phillips says:

    My experiences with sweaters haven’t resulted in wearable sweaters – one because of an unfortunate fun fur collar and one because I didn’t understand negative/positive ease. The second sweater would likely be wearable now that I’ve lost weight but I’ve since donated that sweater to charity. I’m currently knitting a sweater that I think will fit better but it is heavily cabled and slow going – though the latter may be because I am nervous about the fit

  124. Catie Phillips says:

    My experiences with sweaters haven’t resulted in wearable sweaters – one because of an unfortunate fun fur collar and one because I didn’t understand negative/positive ease. The second sweater would likely be wearable now that I’ve lost weight but I’ve since donated that sweater to charity. I’m currently knitting a sweater that I think will fit better but it is heavily cabled and slow going – though the latter may be because I am nervous about the fit

  125. Mia Bella says:

    I’ve knit a few sweaters, though most fit fine there isgenerally something I don’t like, usually the sleeves are too long or improper fit or the neckline is too low scooped. I’d love a copy of the book to learn how to improve or correct these “flaws”. Thank you for the opportunity!

  126. Mia Bella says:

    I’ve knit a few sweaters, though most fit fine there isgenerally something I don’t like, usually the sleeves are too long or improper fit or the neckline is too low scooped. I’d love a copy of the book to learn how to improve or correct these “flaws”. Thank you for the opportunity!

  127. bubiknits says:

    fitting is always struggling me when I made a new sweater or cardigan. I have made just one cardigan that fits me very very well, the others are too big or too wide at the yoke part… so, I signed up for Amy’s and Ysolda web classes to learn how to make a fitted knitting piece. Winning Amy’s book would be great, thank you for the opportunity. :)

    Giusy in Italy (forget my not so good English!)

  128. bubiknits says:

    fitting is always struggling me when I made a new sweater or cardigan. I have made just one cardigan that fits me very very well, the others are too big or too wide at the yoke part… so, I signed up for Amy’s and Ysolda web classes to learn how to make a fitted knitting piece. Winning Amy’s book would be great, thank you for the opportunity. :)

    Giusy in Italy (forget my not so good English!)

  129. Dedicatedknitter says:

    I need that book. The last time I knit for myself , I knit three times! Yup. Extra long swing cardigan that just didn’t right, so I rip it out. Try again. Different but the same, not right, Three times a charm. A little better , or so I thought. My son said I looked extra big, and my husband refused to comment. So I am back to knitting lace shawls and little girl sweater. Those always fit. I need something that will help.

  130. Dedicatedknitter says:

    I need that book. The last time I knit for myself , I knit three times! Yup. Extra long swing cardigan that just didn’t right, so I rip it out. Try again. Different but the same, not right, Three times a charm. A little better , or so I thought. My son said I looked extra big, and my husband refused to comment. So I am back to knitting lace shawls and little girl sweater. Those always fit. I need something that will help.

  131. Elaine says:

    When I first started knitting I skipped right over scarves and went right to sweaters. I made several, including Alice Starmore’s St Brigid, but not one of them fit me well. I’m more than ready to try again but I need this book to help me be sure that the next one will not only FIT but also FLATTER :-)

  132. Elaine says:

    When I first started knitting I skipped right over scarves and went right to sweaters. I made several, including Alice Starmore’s St Brigid, but not one of them fit me well. I’m more than ready to try again but I need this book to help me be sure that the next one will not only FIT but also FLATTER :-)

  133. I like to knit sweaters for my very slender best friend. She looks beautiful in them! I am a bit rounder and sweaters are either too close a fit or too big. So, I prefer cardigans. I love that ‘flutter’, it would look so good on me. Therefore would love to win the book. If not, it will be my 1st of May gift to myself.

  134. I like to knit sweaters for my very slender best friend. She looks beautiful in them! I am a bit rounder and sweaters are either too close a fit or too big. So, I prefer cardigans. I love that ‘flutter’, it would look so good on me. Therefore would love to win the book. If not, it will be my 1st of May gift to myself.

  135. Brenda Castiel says:

    My disasters are from long ago. Fortunately I have learned to measure, try on, and compare my knitting to other garments I own, to make sure I stay on the right track regarding fit.

    Here is one of my sweaters – it fits! https://www.ravelry.com/projects/goodstuff/lolas-top I’d love to win Amy’s book!

  136. Brenda Castiel says:

    My disasters are from long ago. Fortunately I have learned to measure, try on, and compare my knitting to other garments I own, to make sure I stay on the right track regarding fit.

    Here is one of my sweaters – it fits! https://www.ravelry.com/projects/goodstuff/lolas-top I’d love to win Amy’s book!

  137. Lori B says:

    I’ve been afraid to knit sweaters because I don’t know how to ensure that I’ll like the fit – or even know how to make adjustments to the pattern if necessary. I’d love to expand my knitting knowledge and expertise and this book sounds like the perfect way to accomplish that. Thanks for the giveaway.

  138. Lori B says:

    I’ve been afraid to knit sweaters because I don’t know how to ensure that I’ll like the fit – or even know how to make adjustments to the pattern if necessary. I’d love to expand my knitting knowledge and expertise and this book sounds like the perfect way to accomplish that. Thanks for the giveaway.

  139. TrishKnits says:

    Thanks for the awesome giveaway! I’ve put blood, sweat and tears into many sweaters over the years and finally learned the hard way that I can only wear sweaters with some waist shaping and properly fitted shoulders. Otherwise, I just look like a lump! For instance, I’ve very proud of the Must-Have Sweater (from Patons) I made years ago, but can’t bring myself to wear it. All those perfectly executed cables mock me. :( Fitted, top-down sweaters are now my best friends – it’s so easy to try on as-you-go and the fit just right. Case in point: my in-progress Snowbird (by Heidi Kerrmaier) and Tin Can Knits’ Lush cardigan both fit like dreams and make me look and feel like a million dollars!

  140. Keya Kuhn says:

    I knit a 100% wool fitted cabled sweater in a beautiful natural cream color. I got gauge. I followed all instructions. When I was finished and it was washed and dried, I had a choice between looking at it longingly in the closet or getting a boob reduction. Turns out “fitted” meant “fits a boy”. That was the last non-top down sweater I’ve knit. It’s been sitting in my closet for about five years now.

  141. TrishKnits says:

    Thanks for the awesome giveaway! I’ve put blood, sweat and tears into many sweaters over the years and finally learned the hard way that I can only wear sweaters with some waist shaping and properly fitted shoulders. Otherwise, I just look like a lump! For instance, I’ve very proud of the Must-Have Sweater (from Patons) I made years ago, but can’t bring myself to wear it. All those perfectly executed cables mock me. :( Fitted, top-down sweaters are now my best friends – it’s so easy to try on as-you-go and the fit just right. Case in point: my in-progress Snowbird (by Heidi Kerrmaier) and Tin Can Knits’ Lush cardigan both fit like dreams and make me look and feel like a million dollars!

  142. Keya Kuhn says:

    I knit a 100% wool fitted cabled sweater in a beautiful natural cream color. I got gauge. I followed all instructions. When I was finished and it was washed and dried, I had a choice between looking at it longingly in the closet or getting a boob reduction. Turns out “fitted” meant “fits a boy”. That was the last non-top down sweater I’ve knit. It’s been sitting in my closet for about five years now.

  143. Kathy O in GA says:

    I’ve had many things I’ve knit look terrible on me, but one in particular was huge and draped off me! I need all the help this book can provide – I’d love to win it! Thanks for the chance.

  144. Kathy O in GA says:

    I’ve had many things I’ve knit look terrible on me, but one in particular was huge and draped off me! I need all the help this book can provide – I’d love to win it! Thanks for the chance.

  145. Knitmygrits says:

    I have never been able to find a pattern that fits my square, boyish, large busted figure that doesn’t look like a Kimono made by blind squirrels! I knit Every Last Yard recently and it fits ok, but being large chested just makes me never want to knit for myself again. I need something that incorporates a bit of rouching in the chest area and a “tiny” bit of flare from the waist down but can’t find a pattern.

  146. Knitmygrits says:

    I have never been able to find a pattern that fits my square, boyish, large busted figure that doesn’t look like a Kimono made by blind squirrels! I knit Every Last Yard recently and it fits ok, but being large chested just makes me never want to knit for myself again. I need something that incorporates a bit of rouching in the chest area and a “tiny” bit of flare from the waist down but can’t find a pattern.

  147. Sage says:

    I think I really need Amy’s book … I just finished my first sweater and although I loved knitting it, I am so disapointed with the results. It hangs like a box which makes me look bigger than I ever want to look, and there is something weird about the armholes which makes it sort of bat winged. sigh. If I hadn’t heard about this book I’d be ready to give up on sweater knitting … but I’m kinda stubborn, so armed with Amy’s tips, I’m ready to go for it!

  148. Sage says:

    I think I really need Amy’s book … I just finished my first sweater and although I loved knitting it, I am so disapointed with the results. It hangs like a box which makes me look bigger than I ever want to look, and there is something weird about the armholes which makes it sort of bat winged. sigh. If I hadn’t heard about this book I’d be ready to give up on sweater knitting … but I’m kinda stubborn, so armed with Amy’s tips, I’m ready to go for it!

  149. Joanne says:

    Amy’s book sounds fabulous!
    I once knit a sweater out of cotton that was so boxy, and way too stiff. It looked terrible, and I felt like I was in a cardboard box when I wore it. Repeated washings was supposed to help, but no!
    Thanks for the chance!!

  150. Joanne says:

    Amy’s book sounds fabulous!
    I once knit a sweater out of cotton that was so boxy, and way too stiff. It looked terrible, and I felt like I was in a cardboard box when I wore it. Repeated washings was supposed to help, but no!
    Thanks for the chance!!

  151. Diana says:

    I have actually Never knit a sweater ever. I have looked at so many patterns and I’ve even purchased a few and saved many many more… but I just can’t bring myself to make one! I have a really hard time buying clothes that I like, so I guess I’ve always been too scared to put the work in. =P This book is such a good idea! I’m sure it would be a huge help to any knitter!

  152. Diana says:

    I have actually Never knit a sweater ever. I have looked at so many patterns and I’ve even purchased a few and saved many many more… but I just can’t bring myself to make one! I have a really hard time buying clothes that I like, so I guess I’ve always been too scared to put the work in. =P This book is such a good idea! I’m sure it would be a huge help to any knitter!

  153. Kirsten says:

    There are so many gorgeous patterns in this book! Thank you for sharing.

  154. Kirsten says:

    There are so many gorgeous patterns in this book! Thank you for sharing.

  155. Kelly K. says:

    I have a cute black cardigan that flatters and makes me feel put together whenever I have it on. It can be worn dressed up or down. The sleeves and hemline hit me at just the perfect places and helps make me look a bit taller. At 5 feet, I will take all the help I can get. I just wish one day I can knit the exact same sweater in a couple of colors. Then I will be set! This book would be a great starting point! Thanks for the giveaway!

    Rav ID: kellknit

  156. Kelly K. says:

    I have a cute black cardigan that flatters and makes me feel put together whenever I have it on. It can be worn dressed up or down. The sleeves and hemline hit me at just the perfect places and helps make me look a bit taller. At 5 feet, I will take all the help I can get. I just wish one day I can knit the exact same sweater in a couple of colors. Then I will be set! This book would be a great starting point! Thanks for the giveaway!

    Rav ID: kellknit

  157. Quiltmama says:

    I keep seeing this book popping up. It looks like it could be super helpful. I could definitely use sweater fitting help. The last one, I gave up and felted hoping I could cut the resulting fabric up for something. :(

  158. Quiltmama says:

    I keep seeing this book popping up. It looks like it could be super helpful. I could definitely use sweater fitting help. The last one, I gave up and felted hoping I could cut the resulting fabric up for something. :(

  159. florapie says:

    Ugh. My first adult sweater ended up so big and boxy (and itchy, since it was Lopi) that I purposely shrunk it and it was still to big for the largest person I knew. My FLS took me months to make, and then felted in a washing machine accident, and is now waiting for my 6 year old to grow in to it. I’d love to learn how to make a sweater that actually fits me!

  160. florapie says:

    Ugh. My first adult sweater ended up so big and boxy (and itchy, since it was Lopi) that I purposely shrunk it and it was still to big for the largest person I knew. My FLS took me months to make, and then felted in a washing machine accident, and is now waiting for my 6 year old to grow in to it. I’d love to learn how to make a sweater that actually fits me!

  161. adane59 says:

    Would love to knit flattering sweaters, lovely book.

  162. adane59 says:

    Would love to knit flattering sweaters, lovely book.

  163. Connie says:

    I have had both good and bad experiences with sweaters fitting or not. One I frogged after it was completed because it was too big and, then re-used the yarn for another sweater that turned out with “negative ease”, but is becoming. And just a couple of weeks ago I frogged a sweater that had only one sleeve remaining because, once again, the fit was horrible.

  164. Connie says:

    I have had both good and bad experiences with sweaters fitting or not. One I frogged after it was completed because it was too big and, then re-used the yarn for another sweater that turned out with “negative ease”, but is becoming. And just a couple of weeks ago I frogged a sweater that had only one sleeve remaining because, once again, the fit was horrible.

  165. Karen Scheer says:

    I have had ok luck with fitting. I did do one in December I really like and did a little more shaping than normal – waist shaping this time. I’d like to et better at it.

  166. Karen Scheer says:

    I have had ok luck with fitting. I did do one in December I really like and did a little more shaping than normal – waist shaping this time. I’d like to et better at it.

  167. Jen says:

    I am currently knitting my first adult cardigan and am keeping my fingers crossed that it will fit! This book looks amazing and would be really helpful for my upcoming sweater projects.

  168. Jen says:

    I am currently knitting my first adult cardigan and am keeping my fingers crossed that it will fit! This book looks amazing and would be really helpful for my upcoming sweater projects.

  169. I haven’t been knitting sweaters for that long, however I have discovered that short rows are essential for neck shaping, and using increases and decreases for waist shaping is also very helpful. I’m currently obsessed with angora, last years obsession being mohair, so I’ve been experimenting with these fibres and how they drape, and knit up.

  170. I haven’t been knitting sweaters for that long, however I have discovered that short rows are essential for neck shaping, and using increases and decreases for waist shaping is also very helpful. I’m currently obsessed with angora, last years obsession being mohair, so I’ve been experimenting with these fibres and how they drape, and knit up.

  171. Carla says:

    I have experience with both in a single garment. I am very much a Pear and most garments have to follow these lines other wise I look just like a box… My first colorwork sweater was like that: drop sleeves no shape up top. After months of knitting I was sorely disappointed with the results. Good thing while making it I also lost my fear of cutting into my knits and did surgery on it. A new neckline and er-knitted set in sleeves made it into my most favorite sweater ever.

  172. Carla says:

    I have experience with both in a single garment. I am very much a Pear and most garments have to follow these lines other wise I look just like a box… My first colorwork sweater was like that: drop sleeves no shape up top. After months of knitting I was sorely disappointed with the results. Good thing while making it I also lost my fear of cutting into my knits and did surgery on it. A new neckline and er-knitted set in sleeves made it into my most favorite sweater ever.

  173. I made a sweater that did not fit me in the least. I couldn’t give it away or frog it so I have it still, just lying there, waiting for a home.

  174. Lydia m. says:

    I made a sweater that did not fit me in the least. I couldn’t give it away or frog it so I have it still, just lying there, waiting for a home.

  175. Marlene Purvey says:

    Anxiously started a sweater that I’d fallen in love with in a magazine. Bought beautiful rusty coloured yarn. Couldn’t wait to start it. Took me almost 6 months to get it done…sleeves too long. Doesn’t fit the shoulders. Hugs the bum. I hate it! Can’t bring myself to frog it. Just sitting in the basket staring at me with bright rusty coloured froggy eyes!

  176. Marlene Purvey says:

    Anxiously started a sweater that I’d fallen in love with in a magazine. Bought beautiful rusty coloured yarn. Couldn’t wait to start it. Took me almost 6 months to get it done…sleeves too long. Doesn’t fit the shoulders. Hugs the bum. I hate it! Can’t bring myself to frog it. Just sitting in the basket staring at me with bright rusty coloured froggy eyes!

  177. VHuddle says:

    I have learned through a lot of trial and error that I am long-waisted and have short arms. So I try to make these adjustments in my projects with varying degrees of success/failure. I still can not get a top-down sweater or a sweater with raglan sleeves to fit me at all.

  178. Jennifer Jakubec says:

    I would love this book. After multiple sweaters that turned out to be box shaped, I finally clued in that sweaters that do not include any waist or bust shaping are not going to flatter me.

  179. VHuddle says:

    I have learned through a lot of trial and error that I am long-waisted and have short arms. So I try to make these adjustments in my projects with varying degrees of success/failure. I still can not get a top-down sweater or a sweater with raglan sleeves to fit me at all.

  180. Jennifer Jakubec says:

    I would love this book. After multiple sweaters that turned out to be box shaped, I finally clued in that sweaters that do not include any waist or bust shaping are not going to flatter me.

  181. Ali Ritchie says:

    I have an Aidez sitting on my guest bed just staring at me… willing me to either frog it, or to start a mega diet so the arms won’t fit me like sausage casings. Nevermind that the shoulders are too narrow… is there a diet for that??!!

  182. Ali Ritchie says:

    I have an Aidez sitting on my guest bed just staring at me… willing me to either frog it, or to start a mega diet so the arms won’t fit me like sausage casings. Nevermind that the shoulders are too narrow… is there a diet for that??!!

  183. Linda T says:

    I have two sweaters ready to sew up that already look wrong (short and boxy) so they stare out at me when I open their blanket box home. I tried a vest, but it was too small, and even one baby sweater missed the mark. They joined the others and collectively nag and scream “feel guilty” to me too. Hard on the self confidence!

  184. Linda T says:

    I have two sweaters ready to sew up that already look wrong (short and boxy) so they stare out at me when I open their blanket box home. I tried a vest, but it was too small, and even one baby sweater missed the mark. They joined the others and collectively nag and scream “feel guilty” to me too. Hard on the self confidence!

  185. Linda says:

    I’m short but busty, and I find that my handknitted sweaters just add too much bulk to my figure, no matter how much shaping I try to include. Definitely interested to see if Amy has any solutions that would work for me.

  186. Linda says:

    I’m short but busty, and I find that my handknitted sweaters just add too much bulk to my figure, no matter how much shaping I try to include. Definitely interested to see if Amy has any solutions that would work for me.

  187. Knittenwithawhip says:

    I have knitted a grand total of 5 sweaters for myself, 4 of which I unraveled so I could put the yarn to better use, as I looked like a complete freak in each of them. The only reason I haven’t unraveled the 5th one is that it is a work in progress and I don’t know yet how freakish it will make me appear. Is there a sweater that flatters my short-waisted, curvy, busty torso? I haven’t found it yet.

  188. Knittenwithawhip says:

    I have knitted a grand total of 5 sweaters for myself, 4 of which I unraveled so I could put the yarn to better use, as I looked like a complete freak in each of them. The only reason I haven’t unraveled the 5th one is that it is a work in progress and I don’t know yet how freakish it will make me appear. Is there a sweater that flatters my short-waisted, curvy, busty torso? I haven’t found it yet.

  189. Arlene says:

    When i was younger, anything i knit fit just fine, but now that my body weight has shifted, i have more failures than successes. Good patterns for slightly older women are not easy to find.

  190. Arlene says:

    When i was younger, anything i knit fit just fine, but now that my body weight has shifted, i have more failures than successes. Good patterns for slightly older women are not easy to find.

  191. Jen says:

    I’ve knit a couple sweaters that I quite like, but learning more about flattering silhouettes would be super helpful!!

  192. Jen says:

    I’ve knit a couple sweaters that I quite like, but learning more about flattering silhouettes would be super helpful!!

  193. B C says:

    I’ve been avoiding starting my first sweater because of the fit. But the reason I want to knit my own sweater is that nothing store bought ever fits. No one ever said I was logical. ;)

  194. B C says:

    I’ve been avoiding starting my first sweater because of the fit. But the reason I want to knit my own sweater is that nothing store bought ever fits. No one ever said I was logical. ;)

  195. Anne Marie B says:

    I have been waiting a long time for this book. My sweaters are always boxy… Would love to learn more shaping techniques so the flatter my shape.

  196. Anne Marie B says:

    I have been waiting a long time for this book. My sweaters are always boxy… Would love to learn more shaping techniques so the flatter my shape.

  197. Deb says:

    I’ve had mixed success with fitting the only two sweaters I’ve made for myself and so have taken to knitting sweaters for my grandchildren. There are four of them so whatever size the sweater turns out to be, it will fit one of them or one will grow into it! Not the most efficient way to knit. The book sounds like an excellent resource.

  198. Deb says:

    I’ve had mixed success with fitting the only two sweaters I’ve made for myself and so have taken to knitting sweaters for my grandchildren. There are four of them so whatever size the sweater turns out to be, it will fit one of them or one will grow into it! Not the most efficient way to knit. The book sounds like an excellent resource.

  199. Zed says:

    I’ve used Amy’s blog as a reference. And I am thrilled all her expertise is collected in a book…so I would LOVE a copy of Amy’s book! None of my sweaters have come out as I’d hoped. Some are better than others. But I am optimistic that the next one will really flatter me :)

    Thank you (and Amy) for the give-away!

  200. Zed says:

    I’ve used Amy’s blog as a reference. And I am thrilled all her expertise is collected in a book…so I would LOVE a copy of Amy’s book! None of my sweaters have come out as I’d hoped. Some are better than others. But I am optimistic that the next one will really flatter me :)

    Thank you (and Amy) for the give-away!

  201. Caitlin S says:

    Don’t we all have at least one of those terrible sweaters which shall not be named? In my case it was a 1930s pattern for a sweater with short sleeves that was supposed to drape gracefully over ribbing at the waist. While the knitting part was fantastic, the wearing part turned into a nightmare – wrong color, wrong fit, you name it. After all that work, I looked like I was wearing a rubber tire. It was such a disappointment. I would love to read Amy’s book to find out how to avoid such a disaster happening again.

  202. Caitlin S says:

    Don’t we all have at least one of those terrible sweaters which shall not be named? In my case it was a 1930s pattern for a sweater with short sleeves that was supposed to drape gracefully over ribbing at the waist. While the knitting part was fantastic, the wearing part turned into a nightmare – wrong color, wrong fit, you name it. After all that work, I looked like I was wearing a rubber tire. It was such a disappointment. I would love to read Amy’s book to find out how to avoid such a disaster happening again.

  203. Melissa Vink says:

    The first garment I made was a shrug and I was so excited. I tried it on and it did not flatter my figure at all. I haven’t put it on since. I also haven’t attempted to make another piece of clothing since because I’m worried about the fit. I have a cardigan that I am planning to make this summer that I already bought yarn for. This book would be awesome to have and give me more courage to make more garments. I make a lot of hats, scarves, shawls, and socks lol. Thank you for offering this book as a giveaway!!
    Revelry ID: mvink

  204. Melissa Vink says:

    The first garment I made was a shrug and I was so excited. I tried it on and it did not flatter my figure at all. I haven’t put it on since. I also haven’t attempted to make another piece of clothing since because I’m worried about the fit. I have a cardigan that I am planning to make this summer that I already bought yarn for. This book would be awesome to have and give me more courage to make more garments. I make a lot of hats, scarves, shawls, and socks lol. Thank you for offering this book as a giveaway!!
    Revelry ID: mvink

  205. shelley says:

    I knit a sweater for my nephew and the proportions were wrong when he tried it on. I followed the pattern exactly and got tension, so it goes to prove that you have to check and re-check as you are knitting. Sometimes, I just want to knit:) I guess that’s what socks are for.

  206. shelley says:

    I knit a sweater for my nephew and the proportions were wrong when he tried it on. I followed the pattern exactly and got tension, so it goes to prove that you have to check and re-check as you are knitting. Sometimes, I just want to knit:) I guess that’s what socks are for.

  207. Deb says:

    I am always looking for that “perfect fit”. I am a plus size, but, unlike many plus size women, I do not have large hips and legs, and I actually do have a waist. Put broad shoulders, a wide rib cage, and a hefty set of “the girls”- well, there you go. I am hoping this book might be my saving grace.

  208. Deb says:

    I am always looking for that “perfect fit”. I am a plus size, but, unlike many plus size women, I do not have large hips and legs, and I actually do have a waist. Put broad shoulders, a wide rib cage, and a hefty set of “the girls”- well, there you go. I am hoping this book might be my saving grace.

  209. CindyAG says:

    I am new to knitting and have just started a cardigan. This book would be a great help as there are no shops in my town and I need to rely on books or the computer to knit. Thank you for the give away.

  210. CindyAG says:

    I am new to knitting and have just started a cardigan. This book would be a great help as there are no shops in my town and I need to rely on books or the computer to knit. Thank you for the give away.

  211. ikkinlala says:

    I don’t have experience with either kind of sweater that you mentioned, but I haven’t started knitting sweaters for myself yet. I’d like to. As far as store bought sweaters go, I’m hard to fit but can usually find something that’s not too awful even if it’s not ideal.

  212. ikkinlala says:

    I don’t have experience with either kind of sweater that you mentioned, but I haven’t started knitting sweaters for myself yet. I’d like to. As far as store bought sweaters go, I’m hard to fit but can usually find something that’s not too awful even if it’s not ideal.

  213. ChrisS says:

    I knit so my clothes will fit perfectly! That said, it isn’t the quickest way to dress when one knits as slowly as I do.

  214. ChrisS says:

    I knit so my clothes will fit perfectly! That said, it isn’t the quickest way to dress when one knits as slowly as I do.

  215. Connie K. says:

    I haven’t knit myself a sweater so no fitting issues for me there – but I did crochet a sweater once, years ago, that made me look like a Yeti. It was solid white and so big I looked four times as big around. Oh yes, frogged!

  216. Connie K. says:

    I haven’t knit myself a sweater so no fitting issues for me there – but I did crochet a sweater once, years ago, that made me look like a Yeti. It was solid white and so big I looked four times as big around. Oh yes, frogged!

  217. Debbie says:

    Thanks for offering this book in a give-away. I made several sweaters when I was a smaller size that fit beautifully. However, my 3X body defies my attempts. More stitches. More yarn. More time and then it bulges in the wrong place or is too tight. I need help. I hope this book has suggestions for larger sizes.

  218. Debbie says:

    Thanks for offering this book in a give-away. I made several sweaters when I was a smaller size that fit beautifully. However, my 3X body defies my attempts. More stitches. More yarn. More time and then it bulges in the wrong place or is too tight. I need help. I hope this book has suggestions for larger sizes.

  219. Ella Wong says:

    Thanks for the giveaway! Last year I knit 11 sweaters for myself, and by the end of the year, I’d made sweaters that fit fantastically and not so great. I was much more aware of exactly how I needed to modify sweaters to fit me well, and the types of silhouettes that were flattering to me.

  220. Ella says:

    Thanks for the giveaway! Last year I knit 11 sweaters for myself, and by the end of the year, I’d made sweaters that fit fantastically and not so great. I was much more aware of exactly how I needed to modify sweaters to fit me well, and the types of silhouettes that were flattering to me.

  221. Jody says:

    I can really need help with flattering sweaters, thanks for the giveaway.

    I have knitted some flattering sweaters, the best one grew a little in the wash which made me sad but making sweaters and cardigans is so satisfying.

  222. Jody says:

    I can really need help with flattering sweaters, thanks for the giveaway.

    I have knitted some flattering sweaters, the best one grew a little in the wash which made me sad but making sweaters and cardigans is so satisfying.

  223. Pat says:

    Yes! I have one of those wonderful cardigans! It is black, very sleek and all my curves are hidden or at least not very visible. I love it!

  224. Pat says:

    Yes! I have one of those wonderful cardigans! It is black, very sleek and all my curves are hidden or at least not very visible. I love it!

  225. Deepa Nirmal says:

    I think I shy away from sweaters for the same reasons. I’m short and busty, and it’s truly hard to figure out something that will flatter. Waist shaping is a must! My favorite sweater (store bought) is a stretchy cowlneck that seems to whittle my waist while not emphasizing my generous chest. This book gives me hope for handknitting a flattering sweater or two.
    Thank you for the giveaway!

  226. Deepa Nirmal says:

    I think I shy away from sweaters for the same reasons. I’m short and busty, and it’s truly hard to figure out something that will flatter. Waist shaping is a must! My favorite sweater (store bought) is a stretchy cowlneck that seems to whittle my waist while not emphasizing my generous chest. This book gives me hope for handknitting a flattering sweater or two.
    Thank you for the giveaway!

  227. Baljinder says:

    Flattering sweater? Why yes, I do have one that I made. I recently finished knitting Jane Richmond’s Georgia sweater, and I gotta say, I love wearing it. This is the first sweater project for myself that I’ve been completely happy with. Other selfish knits have been frogged or ‘misplaced’, but this one, I think, will stay until it’s worn out.

  228. Baljinder says:

    Flattering sweater? Why yes, I do have one that I made. I recently finished knitting Jane Richmond’s Georgia sweater, and I gotta say, I love wearing it. This is the first sweater project for myself that I’ve been completely happy with. Other selfish knits have been frogged or ‘misplaced’, but this one, I think, will stay until it’s worn out.

  229. Sarah says:

    I’ve only knitted a few sweaters, but all pretty bulky and not too flattering. I’ve shied away from knitting sweaters with finer yarns because of the time commitment. But even the bulky ones I love!

  230. Sarah says:

    I’ve only knitted a few sweaters, but all pretty bulky and not too flattering. I’ve shied away from knitting sweaters with finer yarns because of the time commitment. But even the bulky ones I love!

  231. Elizabeth says:

    I am a brand new knitter and so far have only knitted a hat and started three pairs of socks. I would love to get my hands on this book before diving into the world of sweater knitting. It’s a bit intimidating. :)

  232. Elizabeth says:

    I am a brand new knitter and so far have only knitted a hat and started three pairs of socks. I would love to get my hands on this book before diving into the world of sweater knitting. It’s a bit intimidating. :)

  233. Mandy McElrath says:

    The only sweater I’ve made was for my son and the armpits were too tight. I haven’t been brave enough to make one for myself yet.

  234. The only sweater I’ve made was for my son and the armpits were too tight. I haven’t been brave enough to make one for myself yet.

  235. I’ve never actually knit a whole sweater before. Started Spring Mystery by Vera Sanon, but I quickly realized that I was 1/2 stitch off gauge, so it didn’t fit – way too big. So I ripped it out and never started it again. :

  236. I’ve never actually knit a whole sweater before. Started Spring Mystery by Vera Sanon, but I quickly realized that I was 1/2 stitch off gauge, so it didn’t fit – way too big. So I ripped it out and never started it again. :

  237. I do not often knit sweaters for myself. I have a couple but they do not fit me that well. I think it is a combination of my large size plus narrow shoulders and short arms.

  238. Gretchen Huggett says:

    I do not often knit sweaters for myself. I have a couple but they do not fit me that well. I think it is a combination of my large size plus narrow shoulders and short arms.

  239. Natalie Servant says:

    I made some horribly boxy sweaters that did nothing at all for my figure. I donated most of them, and although I’ve got yarn and patterns for more appropriate projects I haven’t taken the step of starting another sweater. Fear of failure, probably.

  240. NatalieServant says:

    I made some horribly boxy sweaters that did nothing at all for my figure. I donated most of them, and although I’ve got yarn and patterns for more appropriate projects I haven’t taken the step of starting another sweater. Fear of failure, probably.

  241. Kate says:

    Ugh. The February Lady. It was all the rage! I wanted to knit my first sweater. I planned, I swatched, I knit furiously. I picked out buttons ahead of time. I triumphantly tried it on, and poof! I was 20 pounds heavier, inches shorter, and my ego was deflated to top it off. It languished in a drawer making me feel terrible and guilty for not wearing it, my first-ever sweater. I mentally beat myself up: I did all the right knitting things and followed the pattern exactly, but still I looked like a large grape (it was purple) on a tiny stem. I couldn’t even bring myself to take a picture of it for Ravelry, it was too depressing.

    It took a couple of years before in a fit of angst I pulled it back out and started cutting and unraveling. The pile of wiggly crinkly yarn was so cathartic. I decided on a basic raglan pullover to banish the memory. It was clean, it fit, it made me look my own size and shape (maybe a little better even). It wasn’t perfect, but it was right for me.

    Every time I wear it I feel triumphant (and tall).

  242. Kate says:

    Ugh. The February Lady. It was all the rage! I wanted to knit my first sweater. I planned, I swatched, I knit furiously. I picked out buttons ahead of time. I triumphantly tried it on, and poof! I was 20 pounds heavier, inches shorter, and my ego was deflated to top it off. It languished in a drawer making me feel terrible and guilty for not wearing it, my first-ever sweater. I mentally beat myself up: I did all the right knitting things and followed the pattern exactly, but still I looked like a large grape (it was purple) on a tiny stem. I couldn’t even bring myself to take a picture of it for Ravelry, it was too depressing.

    It took a couple of years before in a fit of angst I pulled it back out and started cutting and unraveling. The pile of wiggly crinkly yarn was so cathartic. I decided on a basic raglan pullover to banish the memory. It was clean, it fit, it made me look my own size and shape (maybe a little better even). It wasn’t perfect, but it was right for me.

    Every time I wear it I feel triumphant (and tall).

  243. Heather Green says:

    I have yet to knit a sweater that I absolutely love. Maybe with the help of this amazing book that could change.

  244. Stephanie Hindman says:

    I’ve knit baby and kids sweaters but have been apprehensive to knit one for myself. Thanks for having this giveaway!

  245. Heather Green says:

    I have yet to knit a sweater that I absolutely love. Maybe with the help of this amazing book that could change.

  246. Stephanie Hindman says:

    I’ve knit baby and kids sweaters but have been apprehensive to knit one for myself. Thanks for having this giveaway!

  247. I have never knit a sweater, in fear of it not looking well and as a result all that time and money I had put into the said project would be wasted, because I would totally frog it verses keeping an ill fitting garment.

  248. I have never knit a sweater, in fear of it not looking well and as a result all that time and money I had put into the said project would be wasted, because I would totally frog it verses keeping an ill fitting garment.

  249. Amy Angerer says:

    I have only knit three adult sweaters. The two I did for others fit them both PERFECTLY and were very flattering. The one I did for myself was beautiful when finished, but too tight to wear buttoned and I have not yet found a top that looks good under the wide neckline. I love it though and I think one day I will be thinner and it will fit me perfectly. Sigh.

  250. Amy Angerer says:

    I have only knit three adult sweaters. The two I did for others fit them both PERFECTLY and were very flattering. The one I did for myself was beautiful when finished, but too tight to wear buttoned and I have not yet found a top that looks good under the wide neckline. I love it though and I think one day I will be thinner and it will fit me perfectly. Sigh.

  251. Susie Gardner says:

    choosing a flattering sweater is so key, and soooo easy to get wrong. i’m sure guilty of loving things that don’t really look right once i put them on. this book sounds fascinating and oh so useful.

  252. Susie Gardner says:

    choosing a flattering sweater is so key, and soooo easy to get wrong. i’m sure guilty of loving things that don’t really look right once i put them on. this book sounds fascinating and oh so useful.

  253. Brandy Hyndman says:

    Have only knit myself one cardigan. It fits okay but the back rides up some so I’m constantly pulling it down. I’ve started a second sweater recently for myself hopefully this one turns out better. Would love the book to get some tips.

  254. Brandy Hyndman says:

    Have only knit myself one cardigan. It fits okay but the back rides up some so I’m constantly pulling it down. I’ve started a second sweater recently for myself hopefully this one turns out better. Would love the book to get some tips.

  255. Suzanne says:

    I have never knit a sweater for myself because I have ‘curves’ that do not respond well to the average pattern at all. I am not advanced enough (not even close) to know how to modify a pattern. This book would be perfect for me!!

  256. Suzanne says:

    I have never knit a sweater for myself because I have ‘curves’ that do not respond well to the average pattern at all. I am not advanced enough (not even close) to know how to modify a pattern. This book would be perfect for me!!

  257. Carol-Ann says:

    Nice site and Canadian too. :)

  258. Carol-Ann says:

    Nice site and Canadian too. :)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *